How Do You Price Free Form Progressive Lenses?

Freeform progressives are commanding top dollar at many optometric practices, according to The Vision Council November 2012 Eye Care Professional Report. The most expensive progressive lenses being dispensed were free form progressives which sold on average for $413.14. Free form progressives were less expensive at smaller practices. Practices with only one location sold free form progressives for an average of $402.93, while practices with more than five locations sold free forms for $436.82 on average–over $30 more per pair. Free forms were also more expensive in the Midwest region of the US than other regions ($431.60 in the Midwest vs. $382.39 in the Mountain-Pacific region.

 

How freeform progressive lenses are doing in your practice?

If you have an average practice, you are seeing 2,200 patients for exams with refractions per year per doctor. Approximately 60 percent are getting eyeglasses–that would be 1,320 people (eg: .6 x 2,200 = 1,320). Of the 1,320 people who get glasses, approximately 50 percent are single vision and 50 percent are multifocals. That means 660 potential pairs of freeform progressive lenses per year could be sold in your practice.

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Post-LASIK Education: Let Patients Know They Still Need You

Providing ongoing care for post-LASIK patients keeps them in your practice and ensures that they receive the services and products they need.

LASIK has become a common procedure improving the lives of many of those who undergo it, but many of those same patients don’t realize that they still need to visit their eye doctor annually. In addition to co-managing pre- and post-operative care for LASIK patients, ODs need to educate these patients about why they still need to visit for a comprehensive exam each year. Education also is needed about which products, such as sunwear, are still beneficial, and why a successful LASIK procedure doesn’t mean a patient won’t need to address presbyopia.

Vision and Eye Health Could Change

Although patients can now see well, they need to be examined on an annual basis. For those getting close to presbyopia, they may need reading glasses in the near future and need to continue monitoring their eye health for such issues as glaucoma, cataracts and macular degeneration. Other LASIK patients are very non-compliant and literally disappear after their surgeries, either showing up rarely or never again.

Monitor and Treat LASIK-Related Dry Eye

Many LASIK patients are people who have had dryness issues that affected their ability to wear contact lenses and require treatment methods for anyone who has dryness including lubricants, Omega 3 supplements and punctal plugs when necessary.

Educate On Added Need for Sunwear and Driving Eyewear

LASIK patients are more prone to glare problems after surgery, especially at night. Many patients have LASIK with a monovision modality, so their eyes are unbalanced for distance vision and these patients can often benefit from night driving eyeglasses, as well, that balance both eyes to distance.

Monitor Eye Health Long-Term

Continue to monitor post-LASIK patients for the same medical eyecare problems that can affect anyone such as glaucoma and cataracts. Also monitor the cornea for any signs of a condition called ectasia, which is an abnormal thinning and bulging of the cornea. Since the surgery leaves the cornea thinner, this can happen, although it is uncommon.

Anticipate the Rare Poor LASIK Outcome

In most of these cases, the problems were not medical, but a result of a patient with unrealistic expectations. Some patients who had the oldest refractive surgery, radial keratotomy (RK) have had massive shifts in their refraction over the years, ending up extremely hyperopic. In addition, their best corrected visual acuity is often not correctable easily to 20/20 vision.

Generate Post-LASIK Patient Referral

Ask for referrals of the patient’s friends, family and co-workers who may be interested in LASIK surgery. Often, the patient’s happiness and enthusiasm is highest right after the surgery, so this is a good time to ask for referrals. The referred patients will not necessarily be excellent candidates for surgery, but will then continue coming to our office for their eyeglasses and contact lens needs.

How Satisfied Are Patients With Exams at Independent OD vs. Chains?

Independent ODs are leaving a more favorable impression with patients than corporate-owned optometry chains, according to Jobson Optical Research’s 2012 Adult Consumer Eye Exam Experience. Fewer consumers who had an exam at a chain in the last six months strongly agreed with the statement that overall they were satisfied with the eye exam experience compared to those who had an exam at an independent in the last six months (45.3% and 58.1% respectfully). Indeed, just under half of those consumers who had an eye exam at a chain in the last six months (46%) said the exam was thorough, compared to 58.9% of those consumers who had an eye exam at an independent in the last six months.

Among consumers who had their eye exam at a chain in the last six months, 53.4% said they were extremely likely to return to the same place for their next eye exam. By comparison, 70.7% of those who had their eye exam at an independent in the last six months said they were extremely likely to return to the same place for their next exam.

Of the respondents who had their exam at an independent in the last six months, 63.5% reported that they are currently covered by a type of managed vision care or vision insurance plan. This is greater than the 53.9% who have a vision plan and chose to have their eye exam at a chain in the last six months.

Transitions Optical Releases Multicultural Initiative Report

A new report–Cultural Connections: The 2012 Multicultural Initiative Report–overviews Transitions Optical’s multicultural efforts to date, including research conducted; resources available to both eyecare professionals and culturally diverse consumers; and programs executed through partnerships with industry and cultural organizations. The initiative report also includes profiles of Transitions Optical’s Diversity Advisory Board members, who oversee all efforts and ensure they are culturally appropriate and relevant.

Transitions Optical’s multicultural initiative report is available free-of-charge through Transitions Optical Customer Service at CService@Transitions.com or (800) 848-1506. A printable PDF version is also available online within the “My Industry” section of MyMulticulturalToolkit.com and includes links to useful tools and resources for eyecare professionals.

Do Your Patients Know About their Sports Eye Injury Risk?

Every 13 minutes, an emergency room in the United States treats someone for a sports-related eye injury. According to the National Eye Institute, eye injuries are the leading cause of blindness in children in America, and most injuries occurring in school-aged children are sports-related. The results of an eye injury can range from temporary to permanent vision loss.

The NEI notes that baseball is the sport responsible for the greatest number of eye injuries in children aged 14 and younger. While basketball is the sport that records the highest number of eye injuries for those ages 15-24.

Polycarbonate lenses must be used with protectors that meet or exceed the requirements of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Each sport has a specific ASTM code. Polycarbonate eyewear is 10 times more impact resistant than other plastics.

Eye injuries can include painful corneal abrasions, blunt trauma and penetrating injuries, inflamed iris, fracture of the eye socket, swollen or detached retinas, traumatic cataract and blood spilling into the eye’s anterior chamber. All athletes who have poor vision or blindness in one eye should take particular care to protect their remaining vision.

Tap Opportunity: Daily Replacement Lenses for Astigmatic Patients

Advances in daily replacement toric lenses allow you to improve the vision of contact lens wearers with even small amounts of astigmatism.

Doctors and more and more patients know daily replacement contact lenses are the best choice for comfort and eye health. Until recently this option was not available to patients with an astigmatism who required toric lenses. That is no longer the case.  

A vast majority of patients have at least a small amount of astigmatism. Clinically significant astigmatism starting at about -0.75 DC affects about 35% of patients. The only barrier to tapping this market is misconception. Many patients with astigmatism had negative past experiences with an eyecare provider who told them they could not wear contact lenses or they would be more difficult to fit in contact lenses due to their astigmatism. With today’s technology, there are very few astigmatic patients who can’t fit into contact lenses.  

Maybe Even More Profitable Than Other CL Wearers

A study about the value of contact lens wearers by Mark Ritson, PhD, of London Business School, shows that contact lens wearers are 4:1 more profitable to an optometric practice than spectacle-only wearers over time. If it was a closer margin, the results could be questioned, but this creates such a large, overwhelming reason to fit all patients in contact lenses.

In addition, daily replacement wearers are significantly more compliant than two-week and one-month wearers. It is a win-win!  Patients love the convenience of daily replacement and the practice is more profitable.

A comprehensive business analysis of the different modalities and which patients are more profitable would be helpful to us all. The assumption would be that astigmatic patients are more likely to purchase contact lenses from their eyecare professional because their prescription is more specialized. We should each take time to analyze the business performance of the different modalities of contact lenses that we prescribe and look for trends over time to aid our financial and inventory planning.

Greater Loyalty and Opportunities for Referral

Focus on astigmatic contact lens patients because they are more loyal to their eyecare professional who can fit their prescription successfully. They will often refer more of their friends and family to you because of that perceived “extra care.” In general, contact lens patients come in more frequently and have a stronger relationship with their eyecare professional-a fact that is even truer of astigmatic patients who finally are able to wear the contact lenses they always wanted to wear.

Have the Conversation with Patients

With the enhanced wear-ability of daily replacement contact lenses, the greatest challenge is getting patients to give them a try. Given the chance to try daily replacement toric contact lenses, most of these patients become long-term, enthusiastic wearers.